New Immunization Rules to Attend School

by Ottawa Public Health Vaccine Preventable Disease Program

Are your kids’ immunization records up to date? Before they walk in the door at school next month, they’ll need proof of vaccination against three more diseases: chickenpox, whooping cough and meningococcal disease.

Already, Ontario’s Immunization of School Pupils Act makes it mandatory for every student (unless a valid exemption is given) to have proof of immunization against six other diseases:

  • Tetanus
  • Diphtheria
  • Polio
  • Mumps
  • Measles
  • Rubella

For the 2014/15 school year, records must show your kids have been inoculated against the new additions to the list:

  • Meningococcal disease
  • Pertussis (whooping cough)
  • Varicella (chickenpox): required for children born in 2010 or later 

Focused on keeping kids healthy and safe, these measures are designed to protect them from disease outbreaks in schools.

What does this mean for my child?

If your child is up to date with the publicly funded immunization schedule for Ontario (table below), no further vaccines will be needed. Most of these vaccines are given by your family doctor. Check your child’s personal immunization record, and confirm with your family doctor if you have any concerns. Personal immunization records should be stored in a safe place, just like a passport or birth certificate. Make sure that all vaccines given to your child–even those given by your family doctor–are reported to Ottawa Public Health. You can update your child’s record online in the “Immunization requirements for school registration” section of http://www.ottawa.ca/immunization

To find out more about immunization, contact Ottawa Public Health weekdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 613 580-6744, 1-866-426-888 or immunization@ottawa.ca.

How do vaccines work?

Vaccines help your body help itself. They trigger your body to fight off disease. Vaccines are a safe and important part of growing up healthy.

What vaccines does my child need and when? 

The table below is the publicly funded immunization schedule for Ontario. It shows which vaccines your child needs and when they should be given.

Vaccines needed by age 2
2 months 

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) (five-in-one vaccine)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate-13’
  • Rotavirus
12 months 

  • Measles, mumps, rubella (three-in-one vaccine) [must be given on or after first birthday]
  • Meningococcal conjugate-C
  • Pneumococcal conjugate-13’
4 months 

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) (five-in-one vaccine)
  • Pneumococcal conjugate-13’
  • Rotavirus
15 months 

  • Varicella

 

6 months 

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) (five-in-one vaccine)
18 months 

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) (five-in-one vaccine)
Vaccines for children 
4-6 years

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, (four-in-one vaccine)
  • Measles, mumps, rubella, varicella (four-in-one vaccine)
13 years (Grade 8)

  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV-4) (females only) (3-dose series)

 

12 years (Grade 7)

  • Hepatitis B (2-dose series)
  • Meningococcal conjugate- ACYW
14-16 years 

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (three-in-one vaccine)

 

Vaccines for adults
65 years
  • Pneumococcal polysaccharide
Every 10 years (even as adults)
  • Tetanus, diphtheria (two-in-one vaccine)
Every Autumn  (6 months of age or older)
  • Influenza

 

 

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